Winston Peters vindicated after apology for Trevor Mallard’s trespass notice

The former deputy prime minister called on Mallard to face an immediate vote of no confidence after Wednesday withdrew a trespassing order that barred Peters from entering parliament for two years. Video/Newstalk ZB

The Speaker of the House of Representatives has apologised to former Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters for giving him an “unreasonable and unreasonable” notice of trespass.

In a statement from the newly confirmed Speaker, Adrian Rurawhe, he apologized for the notice sent to Peters by then-Speaker Trevor Mallard.

The statement also said Rurawhe retracted and apologized for comments related to Peters in a May press release issued by Mallard.

“The Speaker has admitted to the High Court of Wellington that it was unreasonable and unreasonable to issue a warning to Mr Peters under section 4 of the Trespassing Act 1980 in the exercise of his powers under section 26(2) of the Parliamentary Services Act 2000,” the statement read. .

“He further admitted to the High Court that the warning was an unreasonable restriction of Mr Peters’ right to freedom of movement under section 18 of the New Zealand Bill of Rights 1990 and that Mr Peters did nothing to justify giving him the warning.”

Trevor Mallard was the former Speaker of the House before Adrian Rurawhe succeeded him.Photo/Mark Mitchell   Winston Peters vindicated after apology for Trevor Mallard’s trespass notice
Trevor Mallard was the former Speaker of the House before Adrian Rurawhe succeeded him.Photo/Mark Mitchell

The High Court’s decision is pending.

Mallard resigned as speaker this week. His successor Rurawhe was confirmed as his successor yesterday afternoon.

New Zealand First leader Peters received his notice of the invasion on February 22 after a brief visit to the Parliamentary Occupation protests with former New Zealand First MP Darroch Ball.

Mallard withdrew the notice on May 4, but Peters initiated judicial review proceedings against Mallard in June.

In a statement, Peters said Mallard’s actions were a “shameful indictment” of his ability as speaker.

Winston Peters made a brief visit to the protests in February and spoke with several people.Photo/Mark Mitchell  Winston Peters vindicated after apology for Trevor Mallard’s trespass notice
Winston Peters made a brief visit to the protests in February and spoke with several people.Photo/Mark Mitchell

“[The trespass notice] Clearly unreasonable and a direct attack on the freedoms of every New Zealander, which are protected by the New Zealand Bill of Rights.

“Mr Mallard’s breach of the Bill of Rights is a disgraceful indictment of his position and responsibility as our Speaker.”

Peters claimed Mallard’s move to become New Zealand’s ambassador to Ireland was a “stunning insult” to the country.

“To think that this behaviour is now being rewarded with overseas diplomatic positions representing New Zealand on the world stage is a huge insult to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and every New Zealander.”

Mallard chose not to comment when contacted by the Herald.

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